Learn from Michael Jackson: Repeat it, and Beat it!


The study “The impact of Ad Repetition and Ad content on Consumer Perceptions of Incongruent Extensions” by Lane R.(2010) emphasizes the importance of repetition. When consumers are exposed to advertisements several times, they tend to be more positive towards a brand or product shown in advertisements. One-exposure to an advertisement may mislead the perceiver.

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Online Social Interactions: A Natural Experiment on Word of Mouth Versus Observational Learning


With internet still coming up as a strong way of commerce in this day and age, researchers looked into ways consumers’ purchase decisions can be influenced by each other. Chen et al. (2011) started looking at online word of mouth and online observational learning as ways this might happen.

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Try or Buy? How that online review can change your attitude towards that mobile application


With ever increasing use of mobile internet, mobile applications (or apps as we like to call them) have become an integral part of smartphone users. It has been estimated that the total market of apps is valued at $27.5 billion. It has a greater future potential than the traditional desktop software. With this growing rate of the use of mobile apps it has become imperative to ask the question “what factors influence sales of mobile apps”. Do people like to try apps before they buy them? This blog post focuses on the study conducted by Guie-Hua Huang and Nikolaos Korfiatis which talks about the role played by online reviews of that particular app which can influence the try or buy decision.

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What makes online content viral?


Consider two news articles. The first article is the most-read Guardian story of 2015, about the Paris attacks (Philips & Rawlinson, 2015). The second article is the third most-read Guardian story of 2015, about flowing water on Mars (Sample, 2015). Whereas the two articles have attracted an amount of readers of similar order of magnitude, the first one has been shared almost 50,000 times, whereas the second time has been shared only 6 times. How is this possible? This effect can be explained by looking at emotional impact, at least that is what Berger and Milkman (2012) hypothesize in their paper ‘What makes online content viral’? The authors investigate the characteristics of news articles and their impact on the amount of email shares. In particular, they focus on the valence of an article and the emotions it evokes. This blog post discusses the research and points out its practical implications.

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